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Low-flow Toilets in Salt Lake City

Your bathroom consumes more water than any other part of your home, and toilets use more than any fixture. A leading figure on water conservation estimates that old toilets use up to seven gallons per flush. The Environmental Protection Agency says that toilets manufactured before 1980 use up to five gallons per flush on average. They’re far heavier than the federal standards for new toilets, which is only 1.6 gallons.

If you’re tired of seeing so much water get spent for flushes, Whipple Service Champions can offer an alternative: low-flow toilets. These modern thrones are the solution to the excessive water use of old toilets. We can install one in your home efficiently.

FLUSHING YOUR OLD TOILETS

It’s common for many homeowners to still have old toilets that are working properly. But as we search for ways to lower our utility bill, keeping those pre-1980 models is a step back. If you’ve already replaced your old light bulbs with LED alternatives that use far less electricity, you may want to consider low-flow toilets, too.

Whipple provides a selection of high-quality models, and we provide warranty for each one we sell. As such, you won’t have to go far to attend to problems you encounter. Our technicians will come by to fix any issue.

BENEFITS OF LOW-FLOW TOILETS

The savings from a low-flow toilet will offset the installation and remodel, potentially cutting more than $100 per year. For some toilets, it won’t even take time to recoup the costs.

But more than anything, using less water is the big thing about low-flow toilets. You’re paying less, and not wasting excessive amounts of potable water. We also ensure that our low-flow toilets are as efficient in flushing as the standard ones, so you don’t have to worry about pressing the flush button one too many times.

If you need more information about low-flow toilets, we can provide you everything you need to know about the models that we sell.

Call us today—and start saving water and money